Homemade Motorcycle Cruise Control

Written by scarlett gauthier
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Homemade Motorcycle Cruise Control
Enjoy longer motorcycle rides by reducing the strain with cruise control. (Jupiterimages/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images)

Just like other vehicles, motorcycles have a cruise control option. A throttle lock is used by motorcycle drivers for cruise control. A throttle lock allows motorcycle users to travel long distances and give their wrists and hands rest by locking the motorcycle at a certain speed, specified by when the throttle lock is engaged. Throttle locks are sold commercially, but you can build your own for a low cost and reduce the strain on your wrists during extended highway rides.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • O-ring (3/16 inch thick)

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Select the material for the O-ring. Three types of materials that can be purchased include rubber, silicone or nitrile. Rubber O-rings will wear quicker than other materials and will require replacement more often. Nitrile or silicone O-rings can be more costly. Silicone O-rings will have better ultraviolet light resistance, while nitrile rings will have a longer life cycle.

  2. 2

    Determine the size of the O-ring required. Obtain a 1-inch O-ring if your motorcycle has bar end weights. If the motorcycle does not have bar end weights, obtain a 1 1/2-inch O-ring.

  3. 3

    Roll the 1-inch O-ring between the throttle grip and bar end weight to engage the cruise control. The O-ring will hold the motorcycle's speed. If the motorcycle does not have bar end weights, roll the 1 1/2-inch O-ring between the switch housing and throttle grip.

  4. 4

    Remove the 1-inch or 1 1/2-inch O-ring from its position to disengage the cruise control. Test the O-ring to ensure that it can be rolled into position and rolled back without difficulty, in case you have to slow down or stop suddenly.

Tips and warnings

  • Obtain O-rings that are smaller in size to add on each end of where the O-ring will be when cruise control is engaged. This will prevent the O-ring's rolling out of place.
  • O-ring sizes depend on the size of the motorcycle’s handlebars. Obtain O-rings that hold snugly, depending on your handlebars' size.

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