How to repair oak veneer furniture

Written by meg jernigan
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How to repair oak veneer furniture
You need a strip of veneer that matches the existing veneer. (Veneer Info)

Replacing damaged oak veneer is not complicated and doesn't require a lot of tools or advanced skills. Use the same steps to make a small or large repair; remove the damaged veneer, clean up any underlayment damage, and glue down the replacement. Cutting the new veneer requires a degree of precision, but if you're uncertain of your ability to create an exact match, make a paper pattern to follow.

Skill level:

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Things you need

  • Straight edge
  • Utility knife
  • Wood glue
  • Clamps
  • Wood glue
  • 2.5 cm (1 inch) paintbrush
  • Oak veneer
  • Kraft paper
  • Sandpaper
  • Oak stain

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  1. 1

    Remove the piece of veneer that needs to be replaced. Hold a straight edge tightly against the veneer and use a utility knife to make a straight cut. Repeat this on all sides of the damage. Keep the lines straight to make the repair less noticeable.

  2. 2

    Repair any damage to the surface under the veneer. Clean out dirt and old glue. The surface beneath the veneer may have separated from the base material. If so, reattach it by putting wood glue between the two and using clamps to hold it tight until the glue hardens.

  3. 3

    Cut a new piece of veneer to fit the area where you removed the damaged oak veneer. Try to match up the grains. If the new veneer is thinner than the old veneer, glue a piece of Kraft paper cut to the size of the repair to the surface under the veneer.

  4. 4

    Use a small paintbrush to apply a thin coat of wood glue to the back of the veneer and to the top of the surface underneath or Kraft paper. Lay the veneer replacement in place and use clamps to hold it until the glue has set. Use a piece of cardboard or wood between the clamps and the veneer to prevent damage.

  5. 5

    Use a fine-grit sandpaper to very lightly even areas where the veneer is not an exact match, for instance, on the side of a table. Apply oak stain to exposed spots where the veneer did not line up exactly.

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