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How to treat a fatty liver

Updated February 21, 2017

Fatty liver symptoms are rare. Thus, people living with the condition are usually unaware of a problem until a routine blood test reveals high liver enzymes. Fatty liver is an accumulation of fat in the liver. Although the condition doesn't necessarily signal a serious health problem, if left untreated, complications such as permanent liver damage can develop. Fortunately there are ways to treat fatty liver and reverse liver damage.

Lose excess pounds. Decrease your body fat to eliminate fat in your liver. Discuss your ideal weight with a physician and strive to lose one to two pounds a week.

Choose healthy foods. Fatty foods such as fast and fried foods contribute to fatty liver. Limit your intake of unhealthy foods and choose healthy alternatives such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Eat a low-fat, low-calorie diet and pay attention to food labels.

Begin an exercise routine. To lose one to two pounds a weeks, you'll need to alter your eating habits and get active. Exercise for at least 30 minutes a day three to five times a week through aerobics, jogging, power walking or biking.

Eliminate alcohol. Alcoholic beverages play a role in liver damage, and they can slow your recovery.

Discuss your medications with your doctor. Certain prescription and over-the-counter medications may cause liver damage (oral contraceptives, rheumatoid drugs and some pain relievers). If possible, stop taking these medications and discuss alternative drugs with your doctor.

Tip

To lose one to two pounds a week, reduce your daily caloric intake by 500.

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About the Author

Valencia Higuera is a freelance writer from Chesapeake, Virginia. She has contributed content to print publications and online publications such as Sidestep.com, AOL Travel, Work.com and ABC Loan Guide. Higuera primarily works as a personal finance, travel and medical writer. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in English/journalism from Old Dominion University.