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How to write an evaluation report

Updated March 23, 2017

No matter what industry, an organisation or company is in business to get results. In order to gauge if you are meeting the goals established by your company, you must perform regular evaluations to determine if changes should be made to a process, focus or staffing. Writing an evaluation report is a basic concept that you can adapt as needed.

Determine what needs to be evaluated (such as a program, campaign, event or procedure).

Create a "Description" section where you briefly describe, in a sentence or two, what you are evaluating.

Create an "Objective" section and describe the goal of what you're evaluating. It can be a revenue goal or outreach results. You should also include a description of the evaluation system; in other words, what metrics will be used to determine success.

Create a "Progress to Date" section and describe the work that has been done up to this point. You can summarise this information or itemise each step that was taken.

Create an "Evaluation" section. Here is where you will give a comparison of the result based on the metrics discussed in the "Objective" section. Elaborate on what you think contributed to these results. If the project is still underway, provide a estimate on where the progress stands and make some recommendations on what it will take to be fully successful.

Tip

You don't have to wait until a project is complete to write an evaluation report. Evaluation reports can prove to be helpful to communicate progress over time as well as providing insight on areas that need to be adjusted.

Warning

Keep your descriptions simple and concise. Summarise where possible, yet elaborate where you need to.

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About the Author

Shemiah Williams has been writing for various websites since 2009 and also writes for "Parle Magazine." She holds a bachelor's degree in business and technology and a master's degree in clinical psychology. Williams serves as a subject matter expert in many areas of health, relationships and professional development.