How to Control Bindweeds

Written by leanne canirs
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How to Control Bindweeds
Bindweed can be pretty, but hard to control. (Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

Bindweed produces beautiful flowers, but this perennial plant, which is in the morning glory family, is often planted by unsuspecting gardeners who are unaware of its invasive potential. Within a few short months, bindweed can take over entire gardens and flowerbeds. Because this invasive plant species is a quick-growing vine, it can be difficult to remove.

Skill level:
Moderately Challenging

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Things you need

  • Landscape fabric
  • Pot
  • Herbicide
  • Black polythene mulch

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Control bindweed by growing the plant in pots. Many invasive plants can be controlled easily by planting them in large pots to prevent spreading. Grow in a pot on a deck or porch, or bury the container in the ground so watering is easier. If you put your container in the ground, cover drain holes with two layers of landscape fabric. This will still allow drainage, but prevent the roots from escaping into the ground. Dig a hole deep enough to fit your container in, but allow at least four inches of pot above the ground. This gap between the top of the pot and the ground will help prevent bindweed from escaping the container and spreading elsewhere.

  2. 2

    Kill bindweed by using an herbicide. Bindweed spreads in two ways, by producing seeds and through roots. Spray bindweed with a systemic herbicide, which will translocate through the leaves into the roots.

  3. 3

    Smother bindweed by using black polythene over the area. Polythene sheets should overlap so there are no cracks or holes for the bindweed to grow through. Put organic material on top of the sheets to keep them in place. The amount of time it takes to kill bindweed with this method depends on how well established the plants are, as well as how hot the weather is. In the summer, it can take four to six weeks; in cooler months, it will take eight to ten weeks.

  4. 4

    Eliminate bindweed by cultivating. Wait until the plant reaches six inches tall, and then pull up. This process will need to be repeated periodically.

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