How to make batter for yorkshire puddings

Written by sally nash
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How to make batter for yorkshire puddings
Serve Yorkshire puddings with roast beef for a traditional British dinner. (Hemera Technologies/Photos.com/Getty Images)

Yorkshire pudding is the ideal accompaniment to a traditional British roast beef dinner. It is a savoury dish nowadays but Lancashire people used to eat it as a dessert. Ideally, Yorkshire pudding should be light and crisp so getting air into the batter mixture is important. Some traditionalists like to let the batter for Yorkshire pudding stand as they believe it improves the texture. However, many other chefs make and use the batter straight away so the jury is out on this aspect of Yorkshire-pudding making.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Sieve
  • Large bowl
  • 6oz (175g) plain flour
  • 2 large eggs
  • Salt
  • Wooden spoon or whisk (hand or electric)
  • 6fl oz (175ml) milk and
  • 4fl oz (110ml) water
  • Measuring jug

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Sieve the flour into a bowl to get as much air into the mixture as possible. This will help give the puddings a light texture.

  2. 2

    Break two eggs into the flour and add a pinch of salt to the mixture. It helps if you make a "well" in the centre of the flour for the eggs to plop into.

  3. 3

    Beat the eggs and flour with either a wooden spoon, a hand whisk, or an electric whisk.

  4. 4

    Pour the milk and water into a measuring jug and then gradually this mixture to the flour and egg combination. If you are using a spoon or hand whisk, beat vigorously each time you add the liquid. You are aiming for a smooth runny batter without any lumps.

  5. 5

    Cover the batter mixture and put in the refrigerator for up to 12 hours if you want to follow the traditional method of making Yorkshire pudding. However, many chefs advise making and cooking the batter immediately, without letting it stand.

Tips and warnings

  • Use plain flour, not self-raising flour for the batter, according to well-known UK TV chef Delia Smith.

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