Causes of burning sensation in legs

Written by kevin rail
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People with diabetes often times are afflicted with diabetic neuropathies--disorders that attack the nerves of the body. When this happens, the feet, hands and legs can experience pain, numbness and a burning sensation. This condition mostly affects people who have been diabetic for 25 years or longer.

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Vitamin Deficiencies

The body relies on Vitamin B12 for proper functioning of the nervous system and brain. It also helps aid metabolism and produces energy. When the body is deficient in B12, there are a number of symptoms that can take place. Some of these include diarrhoea, loss of appetite, dizziness and a tingling sensation in the hands, feet and legs.

Exercise

When the muscles of the body are engaged in high intensity exercise, there is oxygen present. But as the intensity gets higher, the oxygen supply decreases. This causes a substance called lactic acid to set in. When this occurs, there is a considerable burning sensation in the legs. A good example of when this happens is during a spin class when you are cycling really hard.

Sciatica

The sciatic nerve is located in the back of the body; it runs from the bottom of the tailbone down to the feet. It is the largest nerve in the body, and it is about as big around as the index finger. Sciatica is characterised by shooting pain that starts around the buttock area and travels all the way down to the back of the knee. This pain is accompanied by a burning sensation.

Thrombosis

A deep vein thrombosis is a blot clot that takes place deep inside the leg. It can cause swelling, pain, redness and burning. This condition is exacerbated when you are walking or putting weight on your leg. One of the main reasons for developing a thrombosis is from being obese and inactive.

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