Ford Escort Electrical Problems

Written by amy derby
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Ford Escort Electrical Problems
Electrical problems may lead to dangerous accidents. (car crash and police rescue team image by Canakris from Fotolia.com)

Electrical problems in Ford Escorts have led to various safety recalls for risk of fires, crashes, property damage and personal injury. Registered vehicle owners should have been notified by mail to bring the affected cars in for free repairs. Concerned drivers may contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to determine whether their vehicles might have been subject to an electrical system recall.

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1981 AC Wiring Problem Recall

On October 7, 1980, the NHTSA and Ford Motor Co. announced a recall of 7,000 vehicles, including 1981 Ford Escorts, due to an electrical system problem. In these vehicles, wires were inadvertently routed above the air-conditioning suction hose. The wiring mistake could lead to penetration or chafing of the wiring insulation. If an electrical short occurs due to this problem, the wiring harness may overheat and cause a car fire.

1988-1990 Ignition Switch Recall

On April 25, 1996, Ford recalled 7,900,000 vehicles, including 1988-1990 Escorts, because the ignition switch could experience an internal short circuit. These recalled vehicles could overheat, smoke and possibly catch fire in the car's steering column area.

1991 Ignition Lock Roll Pin Recall

On April 6, 1993, Ford recalled 91,000 vehicles, including 1991 Escorts, due to electrical system problems within the ignition lock. The roll pins securing the ignition lock in the steering column housing could move out of position or separate, causing the lock cylinder to disengage from the steering column housing. This could result in locking up the steering column, causing the driver to lose control of the car and crash.

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