Classic English Cars From the Thirties and Forties

Written by jackie michael
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Pin
  • Email
Classic English Cars From the Thirties and Forties
Classic English cars had style and panache. (classic car image by Rainer Schmittchen from Fotolia.com)

In the 1930s and 1940s, cars were huge and cumbersome, but at the same time elegant and graceful. English classic cars are now a collector's dream and can still be seen driving the roads of Great Britain.

Other People Are Reading

Bentley 4.5 Liter Supercharged---1930s

This classic vehicle was the first attempt at a sports car by Bentley. Until then, Bentley had been synonymous with luxury vehicles, as it still is. The 4398cc Engine had a 4.5 litre capacity which helped the supercharged engine in competitions. It was capable of a maximum speed of 120 miles per hour but also served well as a road vehicle when not being raced.

MG Midget M Type---1930s

This racy-looking classic 2-seater was the MG trademark car. Furnished with a pointed tail shape and excellent performance, it was capable of speeds of up to 62 miles per hour--not so high by today's standards, but then a feat of magnificent engineering. Its engine capacity was a mere 847cc.

Vauxhall Ten-Four H-Type Saloon---1930s

In 1937 Vauxhall took great strides forward with the output of this vehicle. Over 1 million pounds was spent on equipment and buildings to produce the Ten-Four, which by today's standards is colossal. The body and the frame were built as a single unit, a step away from conventional methods of auto construction. Its 1203cc engine made it economical at 42mpg.

Morris Minor---1940s

Morris brought out its post-war design of its well known Morris Minor. The legendary classic had an engine capacity of 919cc and 4 in-line cylinders. It also offered 27 brake horsepower at an rpm of 4,400 and could reach speeds of 62mph.

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.