Frontal lobe stroke symptoms

Written by hannah rice myers
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Frontal lobe stroke symptoms

Strokes can affect anyone, young or old. They can happen anywhere in the brain, inside or just outside of it. They occur when one or both of the major arteries carrying blood to the brain become clogged with plaque, eventually preventing blood flow. The frontal lobe is part of the cerebrum and is responsible for planning, organising and problem solving. The symptoms of a frontal lobe stroke would affect these processes.

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The frontal lobe is located in the front of the brain and controls motor function. The neurons in the frontal lobe are responsible for sending signals that initiate motor activities through the body.


The frontal lobe has two sides; the motor cortex and the dominant side, as well as the foremost portion. The symptoms of a frontal lobe stroke will depend on what area the stroke occurred in.

Motor Cortex

A stroke in this section results in weakness or paralysis on the opposite side of the body, affecting muscles in the limbs, the face and the mouth. This will often limit the ability to speak clearly.

Dominant Side

A stroke on this side affects the left side of a right-handed person, and vice versa. It affects the ability to write, speak or gesture with the dominant side.

Foremost Portion

A stroke in this area will result in behaviour that is impulsive or uninhibited, as well as lethargy.

Loss of Abstract Movement

Strokes in the frontal lobe often result in an inability to perform tasks that are complex or that require sequential steps to complete, such as preparing a meal or planning a dinner party.

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