Sulfur & Scabies

Written by tami parrington
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Scabies has a lot of nicknames: human itch mite, crabs, skin lice, or just plain old mange. It looks like a rash, and the actual cause is nearly impossible to see with the naked eye. Scabies is a mite that burrows deep under the skin in tunnels where it lays eggs. As horrible as it sounds, scabies is relatively easy to treat with a simple sulphur solution.

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Background

Scabies is a centuries-old ailment and throughout history, as far back as the Roman Empire, sulphur is the cure of choice. Scabies does not discriminate. It occurs in every race and class. It is not a symptom of poor housekeeping, or bad hygiene, it simply occurs where it will. It is, however, highly contagious.

Preparations

Shampoo and soap are common, easy-to-use methods of delivery for whole body treatment. Creams and ointments for topical application where the outbreak is localised work well, also. Creams and ointments are easier to control, and carried in a gel substance that also helps keep the skin lubricated.

Concentration

Scabies remedies for adults and children have a five to 10 per cent sulphur concentration suspended in a neutral gel, shampoo or cream. Infants less than a year old should be treated with a milder solution of 2.5 per cent sulphur. The concentrations of sulphur used in scabies preparations is not poisonous. Overuse of the shampoo, cream, or ointment will dry out the skin and can cause painful cracking.

Repetition

Sulphur kills the mites, but not the eggs they leave behind.. It is important to keep up with the treatment and repeat the cycle every two weeks in order to kill off hatched mites from eggs.

Reactions

Sulphur is a low-reaction drug with minimal side effects. Some individuals do have allergic reactions to the drug so it is vital to test on a small part of the body before continuing full-scale treatment. If you experience swelling, fever, rash (other than the original infection), or difficulty breathing stop using the sulphur and contact your physician.

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