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Natural treatment for lice on horses

Updated February 21, 2017

While lice are not a common problem among horses, they can be transmitted through contaminated brushes, blankets and tack. There effective insecticidal treatments that can kill lice. But if you worry about your horse's health, take heart: A natural treatment for lice can be just as effective as an insecticide solution.

Boost the Immune System

Like all parasites, lice rely on a weakened immune system to thrive. This is why young, sickened or geriatric horses are frequently stricken with lice while healthy adult horses are not. To boost your horse's immune system, feed her a healthy diet including water, salt, minerals and good mix of quality pasture, hay, alfalfa, grains, pellets and manufactured feeds.

Smother the Lice

Although the species of lice that horses get differs from the ones that humans get, both types of lice respond effectively to the same style of treatment. Natural treatments for humans will work equally well with a horse. Many natural remedies for humans include smothering lice beneath a layer of oily substance. To do this, cover the affected area with mayonnaise or olive oil. Let the product sit on the horse for 30 minutes. Then gently brush to remove the lice. When you have finished, you can wash your horse with a grease-fighting dish soap. Repeat this process every two weeks until all the lice are gone.

Sulphur

Sulphur is a natural remedy dating back to biblical times. Greek medical texts mention that sulphur was used to fumigate homes and rid them of pests. It is completely non-toxic and less expensive than most other home remedies. Sulphur can help control itching and repel parasites. To use it for horses, take powdered sulphur and rub it over the affected areas. Repeat this process every two to three days to catch eggs as they hatch.

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About the Author

Tracy Morris has been a freelance writer since 2000. She has published novels and numerous online articles. Her work has appeared in national magazines and newspapers including "Ferrets," "CatFancy," "Lexington Herald Leader" and "The Tulsa World." She holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from the University of Arkansas.