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Cooking Times for a Topside of Beef

Updated February 21, 2017

There are many ways of cooking topside of beef, but the most popular ways are roasting and braising. Beef can be roasted for different times to achieve different doneness levels, from rare to well done. Many chefs recommend roasting a piece of beef with the bone still inserted as this makes the meat more flavourful. The bone also acts as a conductor of heat to ensure the meat cooks evenly throughout. Cuts of beef boned and rolled are easier to carve once cooked.

Roasting Times

An average size topside of beef with the bone still inserted is 2.5kg or 2.49 Kilogram. A piece of topside boned and rolled is 1.5kg or 15.9 Kilogram for six generous portions. As the beef is usually cooked more toward well done, the length of time each piece of meat is cooked increases. Cooking times are measured by weight.

Rare: 11 minutes per 450g/1 pound.

Medium: 14 minutes per 450g/1 pound.

Well done: 16 minutes per 450g/1 pound.

Temperatures and Resting

To ensure the meat is cooked to the desired consistency, a meat thermometer should also be used. Two types are readily available. The first is inserted into the thickest part of the raw meat and cooked until the desired temperature; the other is inserted after roasting to ensure the beef is cooked correctly. A good guide for temperatures is rare is 15.6 degrees C Celsius/60C, medium is 70C/70C and well done is 80C/176F.

After roasting a joint of topside beef, it should be left to rest for 20 minutes before carving. By doing this, the meat reabsorbs juices lost in cooking and becomes easier to carve.

Braising Times

Another common way of cooking topside of beef is to braise or pot roast it. Meat should be dusted with flour before being browned in a pan before being transferred to a pan with vegetables and herbs with stock poured over it. It is then cooked with a lid on the pan under a gentle heat in the oven (180 degrees Celsius/177 degrees Celsius/gas mark 4) for about 4 hours and 30 minutes or until the beef is tender.

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About the Author

Paul Cartmell began his career as a writer for documentaries and fictional films in the United Kingdom in the mid-1990s. Working in documentary journalism, Cartmell wrote about a wide variety of subjects including racism in professional sports. Cartmell attended the University of Lincoln and London Metropolitan University, gaining degrees in journalism and film studies.