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Do it Yourself Picture Frame

Updated April 17, 2017

Filling your home with pictures can say more about you than any home decor item you could purchase in a store. But in order to display your pictures, you will need picture frames. You could purchase ready-made picture frames from a store, or you could make your own using old window panes.

Materials

To make this do-it-yourself picture frame you will need to gather an old window, a drop cloth or newspaper to lay it on, painter's tape, a paintbrush, paint, sandpaper, picture hanging kit and photo-safe tape. You can also use a glue gun and whatever embellishments you want to dress it up, if you wish. Rhinestones, feathers, beads and fake flowers are all examples of embellishments that you can use on your frame. You can even use little plastic toys to jazz up your frame if you are making it for a child's room.

Getting Started

Because you will be working with paint, which gives off dangerous fumes, choose a well ventilated area in which to work. Lay down your drop cloths or newspapers and set your old window down on them face up. Sand the whole front of the frame to prepare it for paint. Mask off the window panes so that no paint will get on them.

Making It Your Own

Paint the front of the old window any colour you want, or you could even paint a design on the front of it. If you need more than one coat to get the result you want, then let the first coat dry completely before applying another. Once the paint is dry you can add any embellishments you want using a glue gun. When your frame is all painted and decorated, flip it over and adhere your photos to the panes with photo-safe tape. You may have to trim your pictures to fit in the panes or add mats to fill empty space.

Hanging Your Frame

Once your photos are in the frame, hang it for everyone to see. Use a picture kit, following the directions that come with it, to make your frame ready for hanging. Make sure that you use a level when you finally attach it to the wall to ensure that it is hanging level. Look for a wall stud to hammer your nail into if you are working with a heavy window to ensure that the weight of the window doesn't rip the nail out of the wall.

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About the Author

Based in Ypsilanti, Mich., Ainsley Patterson has been a freelance writer since 2007. Her articles appear on various websites. She especially enjoys utilizing her more than 10 years of craft and sewing experience to write tutorials. Patterson is working on her bachelor's degree in liberal arts at the University of Michigan.