Construction safety audit checklist

Written by kristin swain
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Construction safety audit checklist
Employees working safely on a construction site. (Hard working construction worker at a construction scene. image by Andy Dean from Fotolia.com)

Construction sites are full of potentially hazardous situations for workers, making it important that on-site safety audits be conducted on a regular basis during construction. These audits are to ensure that all equipment is operational and the site is as safe as possible for employees. Safety audits help site managers to quickly identify and fix any potentially hazardous situations or equipment before an accident occurs.

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Access

One of the main components of a construction safety audit checklist is the site access section. Managers should check to see whether all routes in and out of the construction site are clearly marked and safe for workers to travel through to their workspace. They should also assess whether or not each employee has easy access to their workspace and if the workspace is stable enough to withstand any nearby demolition as well as constant use by the worker.

Tools

Another part of a construction safety audit checklist is to inspect the tools and machinery being used on the site. The manager should verify that all tools and machinery are in good working order, stored properly when not in use, and that all sharp or otherwise dangerous parts are protected by machine guards. Any tools or machinery that are not functioning properly or are missing their guards should be removed from the site and repaired by a competent technician before any workers are allowed to use them again.

Public Access

Many construction projects take place where it is easy for the public to gain access. As a part of the safety audit, the manager should assess whether or not the construction site is properly gated to deter unauthorised access. Management should also note the placement of signs warning of hazards and denying public access to the area. When the construction site moves into a public area, such as warranting the use of sidewalks or street access, management should make sure that the workers in the area maintain a safe radius from passersby and post signs warning of sidewalk or street closures due to construction.

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