What Are the Health Benefits of Organic Raw Unfiltered Apple Cider?

Written by amelia hooper
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What Are the Health Benefits of Organic Raw Unfiltered Apple Cider?
Health benefits and some warnings are associated with organic raw unfiltered cider. (cider making 2 image by alice rawson from Fotolia.com)

Many health benefits are associated with eating apples, some of which may be slightly lessened by the pasteurisation process. Because apple cider is generally made at the orchard where the apples are picked, raw cider is a natural way to get all the health benefits associated with apples. Organic raw unfiltered cider contains no pesticides or chemicals but contains all of the nutrients that apples do because it is not pasteurised or strained.

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Heart Health

Flavonoids in organic raw unfiltered apple cider may decrease mortality rates from coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease in post-menopausal women. The high fibre content in the cider can lower the risk of death from coronary heart disease by 30 per cent. In filtered ciders and juices, many of the nutrients, along with course pulp or sediment, are strained out and sugar is added.

Cancer Prevention

Regularly eating fibre- and phytonutrient-rich foods and beverages like apples and raw unfiltered apple cider may reduce the risk of digestive tract cancers. The apple skins contain most of the phytonutrients that slow the growth of colon and liver cancer. Further studies are needed to determine whether regular apple product consumption reduces the risks of lung and prostate cancers. According to Dr. Caroline J. Walker of Brewing Research International, cider is made from apples, and apples contain an abundance of antioxidants such as quercetin in the apple peel and hydroxycinnamic acids. Apple juice and cider also contain antioxidants.

Weight Loss

Apples, and apple products like cider, are low in calories and high in fibre, both factors which encourage weight loss. Raw, unfiltered apple cider can lengthen the feeling of fullness, as it contains the apple's fibre.

Respiratory Benefits

Eating a couple of apples a day may prevent the development of asthma, chronic cough and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A diet including apples and apple products including organic raw unfiltered cider may improve overall lung function.

Improved Memory

Regular consumption of apples and apple cider has been found to improve memory and learning and may protect against Alzheimer's disease. Raw unfiltered cider has a higher concentration of these brain-healthy nutrients.

Raw Organic Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar

The main health features of organic raw unfiltered apple cider vinegar include potassium, which helps to prevent brittle teeth, hair loss and runny noses; acetic acid, which slows the digestive breakdown of starch and therefore glucose; pectin, which regulates blood pressure and reduces cholesterol; ash, which maintains pH levels; malic acid, which makes organic raw unfiltered apple cider vinegar antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal; and calcium, which creates strong bones and teeth.

Raw apple cider vinegar may help with heartburn, bowl irregularity, acne, joint pain and stiffness and breaking down fats.

Warnings

Several breakouts of E. coli have been associated with unpasteurised apple cider, especially among students who take field trips to orchards and drink raw cider. The Food and Drug Administration recommends that orchards producing cider should use undamaged apples that were picked as opposed to those gathered from the ground. They should clean and sanitise equipment and storage bottles before making their cider, and keep the cider refrigerated at or below 4.44 degrees Celsius.

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