DISCOVER
×

Signs & symptoms of a ruptured gall bladder

Gall bladder problems such as gallstones or cholecystitis (the inflammation of the gall bladder) can, if left untreated, lead to a ruptured gall bladder. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, approximately 10 per cent of acute cholecystitis patients sustain a ruptured gall bladder. If left untreated, a ruptured gall bladder can be fatal. If you have any of the symptoms, get to your doctor as soon as possible to avoid infection.

Abdominal Pain

Severe pain is present in the upper right part of the abdomen for some time before the gall bladder ruptures. The pain can spread from the abdomen to the back and right shoulder, the chest, or even the left side of the torso. The rupturing of the gall bladder can actually relieve the pain in patients, which often means a delay in seeking medical help. This can lead to complications, such as infection. If you have severe pain in your right abdomen, right shoulder and back, see your doctor as soon as possible.

Nausea and Vomiting

Nausea and vomiting can be symptoms of a ruptured gall bladder. These symptoms, if paired with abdominal pain, should be checked out by a doctor immediately.

Decreased Appetite

A loss of appetite can signify a ruptured gall bladder. See your doctor if your appetite has decreased dramatically and you are experiencing other possible symptoms of a ruptured gall bladder.

Fever

According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, fever and chills affect around one-third of people with ruptured gall bladders. Seek medical help if you have fever and chills accompanied by any of the other symptoms. A ruptured gall bladder can be fatal if left untreated.

Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article

About the Author

Writing since 2009, Catherine Hiles is a British writer currently living Stateside. Her articles appear on websites covering topics in animal health and training, lifestyle and more. She has a Bachelor of Arts in communications from the University of Chester in the United Kingdom.