Alternatives to Crutches

Written by glo ryan
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Alternatives to Crutches
Not everyone can use crutches. (Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

Standard underarm crutches are prescribed by doctors when patients suffer from injuries to their hips or legs. Some patients find these standard crutches uncomfortable because they are situated below the arm and can make their armpits sore and their arms numb. Some patients find it difficult to move with crutches, leading to increased risk of falling. Patients who are uncomfortable with standard crutches can use alternative supports and uncommon types of crutches to move comfortably when recovering from a fall or injury.

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Forearm Crutches

Forearm crutches or triceps crutches fit on the forearm to make mobility and manoeuvring easy. Newer and effective triceps crutches help in making them effective alternatives to the standard crutch.

Hands-Free supports

Hands-free crutches or hands-free supports use a padded knee platform supported by an aluminium rod. Padded straps secure the knee and calf of the patient. Patients can use these supports for all everyday activities. This support is commonly used for patients who have had their lower leg amputated.

Leg Brace

Leg braces use carbon fibre beams that extend from a cross brace at the foot along both sides of the leg.

Knee Walker

The knee walker is a scooter-like wheeled device. The patient transfers the weight of lower limbs to a padded knee platform. These walkers come with baskets and as three or four wheeled models. Compact and foldable, patients can carry them in their cars or folded while travelling.

Wheelchair

Patients can use the traditional wheelchair as a crutch alternative especially when they suffer knee or hip injuries. Patients need to wheel themselves from place to place and use their hands while resting their legs.

Scooters With Seats

Seated scooters help patients with hip and knee injuries and who cannot use hands-free crutches or knee walkers. Patients use their good leg to move the scooter while resting the injured leg. Like the knee walker, the seated scooter comes with a basket. Patients can fold the seated scooter and carry it with them while travelling.

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