How to Eat Scorpion

Written by daisy cuinn
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How to Eat Scorpion
Scorpions are a good source of protein. (Thinkstock/Comstock/Getty Images)

With its sharp claws and venomous tail, the scorpion usually elicits feelings of fear, not hunger. While it may not seem like the most appetizing creature, scorpions are, in fact, edible. While North America is home to several species of scorpion, the large arachnid is rarely eaten in the U.S., other than as a novelty sweet encased in hard candy or chocolate. In China, scorpions are eaten, but not for shock value. They can be fried, roasted, grilled on a stick, and can even be eaten live. If you're new to scorpion eating, start with scorpions prepared at a restaurant or purchased roasted and bagged or canned from an Asian market.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Eat roasted scorpions from a bag or can whole, right out of the package, using your fingers, chopsticks or a fork.

  2. 2

    Use chopsticks to eat whole pan-fried or stir-fried scorpions. Scorpions can be found on some Asian restaurant menus, as well as in restaurants that specialise in unusual food. These scorpions are usually cooked live - the heat makes the venom harmless.

  3. 3

    Bite skewered, grilled scorpions right off of the stick, or pull them off with your hand and pop them into your mouth.

  4. 4

    Find a restaurant that serves live scorpion, if you can. One way to serve them is dunked in wine with chopsticks with the stinger clipped off. Don't try live scorpion at home. Although most North American scorpions are not lethal to humans, handling them can be tricky.

Tips and warnings

  • You can dip your roasted, fried or grilled scorpion into a sauce such as hot sauce, BBQ sauce, or sesame sauce for extra flavour.
  • Do not collect wild scorpions for eating. Some species can be deadly.

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