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How to write a letter asking for a promotion

Updated March 23, 2017

When you make the decision to ask for a job promotion, writing a letter to your boss is a common way to initiate the discussion with him. A person requesting a promotion should write a letter to his boss in a confident, yet respectful manner. This letter should state the reasons you feel you deserve the promotion and why you are the candidate best suited for the position. Keep the letter brief, clear and to the point.

Include your contact information. In a business letter, the writer includes his name, address and phone number at the top of the page. This allows the reader of the letter to immediately know who the letter is from.

Address the letter. Write the letter directly to the person who makes these types of decisions or has a huge influence on the decision. Address it "Dear" followed by the person's name. If you refer to the person as Mr. or Mrs. be sure to use that title in the address.

State your gratitude for working for the company. Tell the reader that you have enjoyed working for this company and include the length of your service. Tell the reader that you are grateful for the opportunity the company has given you to be a part of such a great organisation.

Explain the purpose of the letter. Say that you are writing this letter to ask for an appointment to discuss a promotion. If there is a current opening in the company that you are qualified for, describe the available position. Ask the employer to consider you as an option for this position.

Describe why you want this position. Explain why you would be best suited for the position. Describe your skills, experience and qualifications and offer reasons you would be the best candidate for the position.

Close the letter. Reiterate any additional positive factors that might influence the reader's decision in the matter. Thank the reader for taking the time to consider your request and end the letter by signing it "Sincerely" followed by your name.

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About the Author

Jennifer VanBaren started her professional online writing career in 2010. She taught college-level accounting, math and business classes for five years. Her writing highlights include publishing articles about music, business, gardening and home organization. She holds a Bachelor of Science in accounting and finance from St. Joseph's College in Rensselaer, Ind.