How to make pictures using basic shapes

Written by patti perry
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How to make pictures using basic shapes
Cut shapes of many sizes to create geometric compositions. (Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images)

All pictures are composed of shapes and geometric forms. The simplest shapes, such as the human body and landscapes, can be transformed into simple objects as an educational aid to geometry and composition. Imagine any object as a combination of shapes and dive into the world of creating pictures from placement and patterns of shapes.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Construction paper
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Crayons
  • Markers

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Cut geometric shapes from construction paper. Make circles, ovals, squares, rectangles and triangles of different sizes. Cut more complicated shapes, if you are working with older individuals. Use different colours, if desired; colours may also have a bearing on our comprehension of shapes in pictures.

  2. 2

    Play with them to construct free-form pictures. These may be realistically based or be abstract.

  3. 3

    Glue the geometric shapes together to assemble a picture.

  4. 4

    Add details to your picture with crayons or markers or place smaller shapes on top of the initial layer.

Tips and warnings

  • If using these shapes in a preschool setting, cut them out ahead of time and pass these manipulatives out to students.
  • If you're using this project as an art lesson, show your students that the picture's object and background demonstrate the concepts of negative and positive space. The space around objects changes the way we perceive the actual shapes.

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