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How to clear mucus from throats

Updated February 21, 2017

Mucus build-up in your throat is typically caused by ailments such as colds, infections, sinus problems or the flu. When you get mucus in your throat simple tasks like talking or eating can be a challenge -- and trying to expel the mucus through constant coughing can lead to soreness. There are a number of steps you can take to help clear your throat of mucus.

Avoid milk until mucus clears up. According to MayoClinic.com milk can make mucus thicken and cause throat irritation. Other products to avoid are soy, greasy foods, carbonated beverages and salty snacks.

Boil a cup of water with 2 tbsp of chopped ginger for two minutes, reduce heat and simmer for another two minutes. Remove from heat and carefully pour the mixture through a coffee filter to remove ginger pieces.

Add a pinch of cayenne pepper to the hot beverage and take a slice of lemon and squeeze juice into it. Drink hot and repeat every three hours as needed to help clear mucus.

Drink water between your ginger tea treatments. Drink two glasses at least within every couple of hours to stay hydrated and aid your throat in clearing out the mucus coating.

Blow your nose when you feel it is getting stuffed. Keep your nose as clear as possible and blow out gently, do not blow too hard as this can lead to swelling and nasal pain. Always use a clean tissue as well and wash hands with soap and water after.

Boil a quart of water for five minutes and add a 1/2 tbsp eucalyptus oil. Stir and an additional minute, then remove from heat. Place your face 8 inches from the steamy pot. Inhale the vapours. Do two to three times a day as needed.

Tip

If you smoke refrain until mucus is gone.

Warning

Should symptoms carry on for more than a week or worsen and present with fever, vomiting, sweating, chills or extreme pain in the throat seek medical help.

Things You'll Need

  • 2 tbsp chopped ginger
  • Pot
  • Coffee filter
  • Cayenne pepper
  • Lemon slice
  • Disposable tissues
  • ½ tbsp. eucalyptus oil
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About the Author

Amy Davidson is a graduate from the University of Florida in Gainesville, with a bachelor's degree in journalism. She also writes for local papers around Gainesville doing articles on local events and news.