DIY Vibration Isolation

Written by david lipscomb Google
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DIY Vibration Isolation
A common racquetball is a popular suspension device for DIY vibration isolation. (Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images)

Do-it-yourself vibration isolation is a very important factor in audio systems. Damaging vibrations are responsible for skipping and mistracking compact disc players and turntables. In addition, these vibrations slowly impact the built-in vibration damping inside these players, reducing their effectiveness over time. You can do one version of this project inexpensively, using surprising materials.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • 4 to 8 tennis balls
  • Serrated knife
  • 20-by-20 paving stone
  • Audio system (amplifier, speakers)
  • Audio component (compact disc player, turntable)

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Cut two tennis balls in half, using the serrated knife. Ensure both halves of each ball are equal.

  2. 2

    Turn the balls open-side down against the solid, flat rack or shelf that the isolation platform will be placed upon.

  3. 3

    Set the 20-by-20 paving stone on top of the four tennis-ball halves. Adjust the tennis balls so that they are evenly spaced at the four corners.

  4. 4

    Center the component (compact disc player or turntable) on top of the paving stone.

  5. 5

    Turn on the audio system (amplifier or speakers). Play a music CD or record that is known to cause the component to skip or mistrack. Walk around the component while it is playing to produce floor vibrations if this is the main cause of the playback problems.

  6. 6

    Add more ball halves under the stone as needed, evenly spaced, until the stone exhibits no more vibration.

Tips and warnings

  • Other dense materials are often used for this project. Items such as butcher blocks, thick flooring tile, and plywood sheets are common platform choices.

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