How to Make a Climate Graph With Negative Numbers

Written by shae hazelton
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A climate graph displays variations in temperature over a certain amount of time. A truly accurate climate graph should show the positive temperatures as well as when the temperatures dip below zero degrees. Creating a climate chart that displays both positive and negative temperatures is similar to any other climate graph, so anyone with graph-making experience should have no trouble creating one. Work diligently on the graph to make it appear accurate and professional.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Graph paper
  • Pencil

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Collect the weather statistics for the period of time you will cover on the chart. The statistics may come from a single day or they can span over years depending on the type of chart you want.

  2. 2

    Draw one vertical pencil line 1 inch away from the left end of a piece of graph paper. Draw a second line horizontally 1 inch away from the bottom edge of the paper.

  3. 3

    Write temperatures in increments of 20 on the left side of the vertical line. Place a negative number to signify a negative temperature where the vertical line intersects with the horizontal line and a positive number to signify a positive temperature at the top of the line. Space all the temperatures at equal distances along the line.

  4. 4

    Draw horizontal lines stretching from each of the temperatures on the left side of the page all the way to the right end of the page. Use a straight edge ruler to create straight lines.

  5. 5

    List the different increments of time on the bottom side of the lowest horizontal line on the chart. For example, if you are recording the temperature in daylong increments, place the dates of each recorded day along this horizontal line. Space the writing equally along the horizontal line.

  6. 6

    Draw vertical lines from the each word along the bottom horizontal line. Space the lines equally and use a straight edge ruler to keep them straight.

  7. 7

    Place a red dot where the lines of relative data intersect. This means if the temperature was negative -6.67 degrees C on Monday, you would put a red dot on the lines that intersect between negative 20 degrees and Monday.

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