How to Repair or Fix the Chipped Paint on a Ceiling or a Wall

Written by cody sorensen
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How to Repair or Fix the Chipped Paint on a Ceiling or a Wall
Paint chips are unavoidable. (Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

Fixing chipped paint on a ceiling or wall is something every homeowner faces sooner or later. The chips can occur when a foreign object strikes the wall and nicks the paint job. If the area is repainted, the paint gathers in the crevices and corners of the chip, making the chip even more obvious to the eye. You can repair the chip so no one will ever know it was there.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Quick-drying repair mud, small tub
  • 2- or 3-inch putty knife, depending on the size of the paint chip
  • 120-grit sanding block
  • Drywall primer
  • Paintbrush
  • Finish paint

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Dip the blade of the putty knife into the quick-drying repair mud. Take out enough mud to fill the paint chip hole.

  2. 2

    Spread the mud over the paint-chipped area until the hole is filled up to the level of the surrounding surface. Scrape the blade directly over the hole to make it flush with the adjacent surface.

  3. 3

    Allow the mud to dry for two to three hours.

  4. 4

    Sand the dry mud with a 120-grit sanding block.

  5. 5

    Apply a second coat of mud over the first layer. Allow it to dry.

  6. 6

    Sand the area again until the repair is flush with the surrounding area. Keep the sanding block flat on the surface to avoid gouging out the repair mud.

  7. 7

    Prime the mud with some drywall primer, using a paintbrush. Allow the primer to dry for a few hours.

  8. 8

    Paint over the primer with paint that matches the rest of the wall or ceiling. Feather the brush strokes out so they won't be visible when the paint dries.

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