How to Propagate Hybrid Tea Roses

Written by tracy morris
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Hybrid tea roses are some of the most abundant roses found on the market today. These roses are a cross between European roses and roses from China. Hybrid tea roses are also known as ever-blooming roses, due to their habit of producing flower buds from spring until fall. Hybrid tea roses are not frequently rooted because cuttings can take a long time to propagate and grow. Despite this, taking cuttings is one of the simplest means of propagating a hybrid tea rose. Before starting, make sure the rose you want to propagate isn't protected by a trademark.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Bleach
  • Pruning shears
  • Plastic bucket
  • Rooting hormone
  • Peat container
  • Peat moss
  • Plastic freezer bag
  • Shovel
  • Straw

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Plan to take cuttings when the rose cane is dormant, between fall and spring. Roses propagate more easily during this time.

  2. 2

    Prepare a solution of 1 part bleach and 9 parts water. Dip your pruning shears in this solution to sterilise them and prevent the spread of powdery mildew.

  3. 3

    Fill a plastic bucket halfway with water. You will place the stems of cuttings into this water to keep them from drying out.

  4. 4

    Select a rose cane that is 1 to 2 feet long, disease-free and produced superior roses during the summer. Place the pruning shears just above an outward-facing bud and cut the cane. Place the cane in the bucket of water. Cut any additional canes, then transport them in the bucket to your work area.

  5. 5

    Remove all foliage and flowers from the cane. Cut the cane into sections that are 6 to 8 inches long, each with three leaf nodes -- points where a leaf or flower stem emerged. Make each cut directly across the cane, just above a leaf node.

  6. 6

    Fill a peat pot with peat moss. Soak the peat moss so that it is as damp as a wrung-out sponge.

  7. 7

    Dip the bottom end of a cane in rooting hormone. Plant the cane in the centre of the peat moss so two-thirds of its is buried. New roots will emerge from the end of the cane and the leaf nodes.

  8. 8

    Cover the rose cane and the peat pot with a plastic freezer bag. Put the bag in a sunny windowsill, but out of direct sunlight. Check the container daily and water when the peat moss becomes slightly dry. Never let the peat moss dry out completely.

  9. 9

    Transplant your rooted rose cutting to its permanent location in early fall of the following year. Roses develop extensive roots during winter when they are not producing flowers. Choose a location that receives full sun and has well-drained soil.

  10. 10

    Dig a planting hole that is slightly bigger than the peat pot. Place the entire pot in the soil. Cover the pot with soil. Add a layer of straw around the base of the rose to protect it.

Tips and warnings

  • Late fall is a favourite time to take cuttings, according to the Texas A&M; University Extension. A few blooms usually are left the rose bush in fall, so you can identify the type of rose.
  • Some varieties of rose are trademarked. It is illegal to propagate trademarked plants for commercial resale.
  • Wear sturdy leather gloves when working with roses. Their thorns are sharp enough to scratch or cut you.

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