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How to remove & put back balusters & railings

Updated February 21, 2017

Remodelling you home or starting a home improvement project may require you to disassemble or take apart various pieces of furniture or other structures in your home. This process can include removing the stair rail and balusters from a staircase if you need to refinish or replace them. However, when the remodel or home improvement project is complete the stair rail and balusters need to be put back in place.

Find and remove the nails that were used to secure the balusters to the stair rail with the nail remover or use a cat's claw to pry them out.

Find and remove the screws or nails that were used to secure the railing to the newel posts at the top and bottom of the stairs. Remove the screws or nails using a power drill or a nail remover.

Lift the railing off of the balusters and off the newel posts. Set the railing aside. Twist and pull on the balusters to remove them from each stair.

Clean out the holes in the stair with the sandpaper to remove any glue residue.

Place a small amount of wood glue in each hole in the stair.

Insert the bottom of the baluster into the first hole and push down to make sure it fits securely. Repeat this step for the remaining balusters.

Set the stair railing on top of the balusters and align it with the newel post. Set each baluster so that all of them are flush with bottom of the railing.

Secure the railing to the newel posts with the screws using the power drill. Secure the balusters to the railing with nails using the nail gun.

Tip

Mark each baluster as you remove it so you know the order to follow to put them back.

Things You'll Need

  • Nail remover
  • Cat's claw
  • Power drill
  • Sandpaper
  • Wood glue
  • Nail gun
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About the Author

Cameron Easey has over 15 years customer service experience, with eight of those years in the insurance industry. He has earned various designations from organizations like the Insurance Institute of America and LOMA. Easey earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in political science and history from Western Michigan University.