How to Find an Acting Agent for Kids and Teens

Written by lane cummings
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How to Find an Acting Agent for Kids and Teens
In some ways, getting a child or teenager a theatrical agent is easier than an adult actor. (children image by Mat Hayward from Fotolia.com)

An acting agent is called a theatrical agent, and this person, if representing a child or teenager, can submit them for auditions for television shows, web series and films. In some ways, getting an agent for a child or teen is easier than for an adult actor because many agents don't expect most teens or children to have had a lot of experience or prior credits. Getting representation will largely depend on the child or teen's look and personality.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Pen
  • Paper
  • Computer
  • Five to seven outfits for child or teen
  • Headshots
  • Paper
  • Resumes
  • Paper-cutter
  • Stapler
  • Envelopes

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Visit the website talentagencymatch.com and click on the state where you live. A list will come up of talent agencies in your state. Check them carefully as some of them may just be modelling agencies. Look for words like "Full Service" or "Film/TV/Theatre" under the company description. Check the profile to make sure they represent minors.

  2. 2

    Make a list of all the agencies in your state that represent children and teenagers for television, film and theatre. Call each agency and ask them for a preferred headshot photographer for children. Every agency has a couple favourites. Write down their names.

  3. 3

    Visit the website of each headshot photographer. View samples of their work. Pick one that you can afford and that you think would best capture your child or teenager. Contact that photographer and make an appointment.

  4. 4

    Bring five to seven different outfits for your child or teenager on the day of the headshot shooting. Ask the photographer for a recommended photo printing shop for headshots when finished. Pick a shot from the shoot that best captures your child's personality and have copies printed in an 8 x 10 inch size.

  5. 5

    Jot down a list of acting-related experiences your child or teen has had. Write down any school plays, student films, television shows, and acting or dance classes she has taken part in. Write down any special skills your child has, such as foreign languages or gymnastics training.

  6. 6

    Type up a resume for your child using your list as a guide. To view a sample resume for how a child actor resume should look, go to the website bestsampleresume.com and click on "acting resumes" from the left hand menu. Scroll down to the bottom and click on "sample child actor resume."

  7. 7

    Print out a copy of the resume for each headshot you have. Trim the resume down to 8 x 10 inches with a paper cutter and staple one to the back of each resume.

  8. 8

    Type a letter to each agent that you intend to query with the headshot and resume. The letter should be short and simple and say something to the effect of: "I'm submitting my son's/daughter's headshot and resume for your consideration. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at..." Make sure to leave a contact phone number and e-mail address.

  9. 9

    Print out the letters. Send a headshot and resume and letter in a large envelope to each agent from your list. The agent will evaluate whether or not he wants to represent your child or teenager based largely on how effective he thinks the headshot is. If interested, the agent will call you to make an appointment with you or your child.

  10. 10

    Tell your child or teenager to dress in an outfit similar but not identical to the one she wore when she took her headshots. When meeting the agent, it's important that the child or teenager feel comfortable, express her personality with ease and that you both ask any questions that you might have. If interested the agent will make an offer for representation at that meeting or in a few days.

Tips and warnings

  • If you have a friend or family member who has a theatrical agent, ask him for a referral to his agent.

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