How to Make Name Badge Labels From an Excel List

Updated February 21, 2017

Microsoft Excel is spreadsheet software that you can use to keep track of people who are attending a meeting or convention and will need a name badge. However, you will need to Microsoft Word's mail merge to print those labels. The mail merge routine pulls information from Excel and formats your labels for you. All you need to do is buy the labels, plug in a few vital pieces of information and print your labels.

Open Microsoft Word.

Click on "Letters and Mailings" in the Tools menu, then click "Mail Merge Wizard."

Click on "Labels" in Step 1 of the Mail Merge wizard, and then click "Label options" in Step 2 of the Mail Merge wizard. Select the size of your name badge labels from the list.

Click "next," then click "Use an existing list," and click the "Browse" button.

Find your Excel file, then click "Open."

Find your list in the Select Table box and click it. Check the "First row of data contains column headers" box, then click "OK."

Look at the word labels to the left (in the Mail Merge Recipients dialogue box) and then click any column labels that match. For example, you might see a match for "name," so click on it. Your basic labels have been created.

Open Microsoft Word. A blank document will automatically open.

Click the "Mailings" tab and then click the "Start Mail Merge" button.

Click "Step by Step Mail Merge Wizard."

Click on the "Labels" radio button, then press "Next: Starting Document."

Click on the "Start from existing document" radio button, locate your Excel document, then press "Next." Follow the instructions to choose label size and printer, pressing "Next" each time to complete the process.


Excel data should be in a list with column labels that identify what is in the column (for example, names). This helps you easily set up the mail merge.

Things You'll Need

  • Saved Excel worksheet with names
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About the Author

Stephanie Ellen teaches mathematics and statistics at the university and college level. She coauthored a statistics textbook published by Houghton-Mifflin. She has been writing professionally since 2008. Ellen holds a Bachelor of Science in health science from State University New York, a master's degree in math education from Jacksonville University and a Master of Arts in creative writing from National University.