Easy Treatments for Sarcoptic Mange in Rabbits

Updated February 12, 2018

Sarcoptic mange, also known as scabies or fur mites, is a relatively common problem in house rabbits. Starting as raw itchy patches around the nose and front of the face, rabbits may be seen scratching until their skin is raw, sometimes causing secondary bacterial infections. Bald patches and dandruff may also be symptoms of infestation. Scotch tape samples, scraping or biopsy at your veterinarian can confirm a suspected case of sarcoptic mange so that an easy treatment plan is initiated immediately.


Revolution is one of the two most popular main treatments for sarcoptic mange in rabbits. The rabbit is given .1cc of kitten strength Revolution per kilogram of body weight between the shoulder blades. Revolution is given topically and is not an injectible or oral medication. The dose is normally repeated once per month for three months. Some vets recommend a low preventive dose for rabbits who seem to be particularly prone to mites.


Ivermectin is the other main treatment used in response to sarcoptic mange in rabbits. Three injections are given at your veterinarian's office 14 days apart. Ivermectin is not effective when administered topically or orally.

Benzyl Benzoate

Benzyl benzoate is used alongside ivermectin treatment as a topical antiparasitic insecticide. Applied every fifth day to wounds from sarcoptic mange, it kills any mites present, helping infestation to clear and wounds to heal faster.

Environmental Treatment

Environmental treatment of sarcoptic mange is also necessary in order to prevent re-infestation. Rabbit living quarters should be disinfected thoroughly and all carpet and upholstery should be treated with a boric acid solution intended for killing mites and fleas. Cleaning should be repeated with each subsequent dose of Revolution or ivermectin.

bibliography-icon icon for annotation tool Cite this Article

About the Author

Anne Kinsey is a writer, business woman, minister and coach who is passionate about inspiring others to walk out their career dreams and believe in possibilities. She resides in rural North Carolina with her husband and three children, where they enjoy the great outdoors and serve at-risk youth together.