How to drive on a two-lane roundabout

Written by kyle mcbride
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A roundabout, which in some areas may be referred to incorrectly as a roundabout, is an intersection design which allows traffic to keep moving. Unlike an intersection with a traffic light which stops traffic on each roadway in turn, a roundabout allows all the vehicles to keep moving as they pass through or exit on the way to their respective destinations. Single-lane roundabouts are pretty straightforward, but two-lane roundabouts can be confusing.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Observe signage as you approach the roundabout. Obey lane choice signs.

  2. 2

    Operate your vehicle in the right-hand lane as you approach the roundabout if you are exiting right immediately or if you are exiting across the roundabout to continue on the same route. Stay in the right-hand lane as you enter the roundabout. Yield right-of-way to both lanes of traffic already in the roundabout coming up on your left.

  3. 3

    Operate your vehicle in the left-hand lane as you approach the roundabout if you are exiting 3/4 of the way around the roundabout (left turn) or if you are performing a U-turn. Stay in the left-hand lane as you enter the roundabout. Yield right-of-way to both lanes of traffic already in the roundabout coming up on your left.

  4. 4

    Keep moving while in the roundabout. Do not stop. If you miss your exit, execute a safe lane change into the left lane inside the roundabout. Continue around the roundabout and then try again to exit on the next pass.

Tips and warnings

  • Stay in your lane on the approach to the roundabout, while you are in the roundabout and when you are exiting the roundabout. Do not cross from the left lane in the roundabout to the right lane as you exit the roundabout.

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