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How to Repair Walnut Furniture Veneer

You found a great end table at a yard sale or inherited an old sideboard from grandmother, but there is a section of walnut veneer conspicuously chipped or bulging from the surface. With the right materials and attention to detail, even the uninitiated can make that piece look new again by repairing the damage with a simple veneer patch.

Cut the damaged area of veneer by sliding your utility knife along the edge of the metal ruler. Cut through the veneer down to the core wood.

Pull the veneer away from the core wood. Scrape away any residue. Match up the grain of the patch of new walnut veneer to the piece of damaged furniture.

Cut a section of new veneer slightly larger than the old damaged piece. Brush a coat of contact cement to the back of the veneer. Brush a coat of contact cement to the core wood of the piece of furniture. Let dry until tacky. Repeat for a second coat.

Position the new veneer in place. Exert pressure on the veneer by rolling the area with the wallpaper roller.

Use sandpaper to sand down any overhanging edges. Stain the new veneer to match the furniture's walnut veneer.

Fill the seams with a matching furniture putty stick. Stain again. Apply finish to the entire surface of the piece of furniture.

Tip

Veneer may be hard to find at your local hardware store, so search online, as well as brick and mortar, woodworking and veneer supply stores.

Things You'll Need

  • Walnut veneer
  • Metal utility knife
  • Ruler
  • Contact cement
  • Paintbrush
  • Wallpaper roller
  • Furniture putty stick
  • Sandpaper
  • Stain
  • Finish
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About the Author

Susan DeFeo has been a professional writer since 1997. She served as a community events columnist for New Jersey's "Cape May County Herald" for more than a decade and currently covers the family and pet beat for CBS Philadelphia. Her health, fitness, beauty and travel articles have appeared in various online publications. DeFeo studied visual communications at SUNY Farmingdale.