How to remove silicon sealant

Written by c.l. rease
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Silicone sealant is widely used due to its ability to remain flexible in a wide variety of situations. Silicone creates an impenetrable bond that repels water and air. Even after years of exposure to water and outside elements, the bond created by the silicone sealant will remain tight. This is the main reason why silicone sealant removal is so difficult. Scoring, scraping, and cutting will remove the majority of the silicone caulk, but damage can be caused to the surfaces being cleared of the silicone. Applying a silicone sealant remover will ease the removal process.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Safety glasses
  • Rubber gloves
  • Silicone sealant remover
  • Acid brush or small paint brush
  • Small putty knife
  • Clean rags

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Clear the area of the silicone sealant to be removed. Clean the silicone sealant thoroughly with a household cleaner to remove any build-up that will interfere with the application of the silicone remover. Put on your safety glasses and rubber gloves before opening the silicone sealant remover.

  2. 2

    Open a window and set up a fan if you are working indoors to allow adequate ventilation. Apply the silicone sealant remover to the silicone caulk. Use the acid brush to evenly coat the silicone. Apply thinner coats of silicone sealant remover to vertical seams to reduce the amount of remover that runs off of the seams. Allow the silicone remover to penetrate the caulk for the manufacturer's recommended length of time.

  3. 3

    Scrape the silicone sealant with the putty knife. Use small back and forth motions to lift the silicone away from the caulk joint. Dispose of the caulk. Brush another coat of silicone sealant remover to the area of the caulked seam. Wipe the area clean to remove remaining traces of silicone.

  4. 4

    Thoroughly clean the area with a mild detergent and water to remove any silicone remover that remains in the seam. Allow the area to dry completely before you reseal the seam.

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