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How to hang heavy mirrors

Updated April 17, 2017

You can hang lightweight mirrors the same way that you hang a picture. Very heavy mirrors, on the other hand, require sturdier equipment. If there is a stud behind the drywall on which you'd like to hang the mirror, you can simply hang the mirror on a nail. Otherwise, special materials are necessary. Hanging a heavy mirror is a two-person job, so make sure you have someone else to help you before you begin.

Use a pencil to mark the four corners of the plank and drill holes over the markings.

Place the plank on the wall and mark where the holes touch the wall. Drill four small pilot holes into the wall over the markings.

Use the hammer to drive the expansion bolts through the holes in the plank into the holes in the wall. The expansion bolts are made of a screw with legs that pull back once the bolt is in the wall.

Use the screwdriver to tighten the bolts. This pulls back the legs of the bolt and anchors the bolts in the wall.

Use the hammer to put a strong nail into the centre of the plank.

Drill two pilot holes in the back of the mirror's frame, a couple of inches from the top.

Push the D-rings into the pilot holes with the screws.

Thread the mirror wire through the D-rings, leaving it taut between the two rings. Attach the end of the wire to the D-shaped piece, and twist the excess wire together.

Hang the mirror on the nail in the plank. This will distribute the weight evenly across the four expansion bolts.

Tip

Buy the highest-quality D-rings available to make sure that your mirror will hang securely. Weigh your mirror to make sure that you are using extension bolts for the correct weight.

Warning

Never overtighten screws, or the frame of the mirror will crack. Toggle bolts cannot be removed and reused, so make sure you have them in the right place before you hammer them in.

Things You'll Need

  • Pencil
  • 12-inch long plank of wood
  • Drill
  • Hammer
  • Expansion bolts (Molly or toggle bolts)
  • Screwdriver
  • Nail
  • Mirror
  • D-rings and screws
  • Mirror wire
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About the Author

Keren (Carrie) Perles is a freelance writer with professional experience in publishing since 2004. Perles has written, edited and developed curriculum for educational publishers. She writes online articles about various topics, mostly about education or parenting, and has been a mother, teacher and tutor for various ages. Perles holds a Bachelor of Arts in English communications from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.