How to Get Rid of Swimmer's Ear

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How to Get Rid of Swimmer's Ear
Keep your ears clean so you don't develope swimmer's ear

Has your daily backstroke left bacteria swimming in your ear? Swimmer's ear, a bacterial or fungal infection of the outer ear canal, causes painful, swollen or itchy ears or redness in the ear area. Other symptoms include mild hearing loss or a milky discharge.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Antiseptic Ear Drops Or Isopropyl Alcohol
  • Medicine Dropper
  • Swimming Cap
  • Heating Pad Or Hot Water Bottle
  • Hair Dryer

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Use over-the-counter antiseptic ear drops or apply a drop or two of isopropyl alcohol with a medicine dropper in the ear canal. Shake your head to swish about the drops and then tilt the head to allow the canal to drain out. The ear drops or alcohol dry up excess water and help kill bacteria.

  2. 2

    Ease the pain with a heating pad or hot water bottle.

  3. 3

    Visit a doctor for a proper diagnosis, especially if the lymph glands are swollen, if the ear is swollen shut or extremely painful, or if a fever accompanies the infection. A doctor may prescribe antibiotics (drops or oral), corticosteroid ear drops to reduce swelling, or medication to reduce pain

  4. 4

    Avoid swimming or submersion in water for at least 10 days after treatment to allow the ear to fully dry out and heal.

  5. 5

    To prevent swimmer's ear, wear a swimming cap. After a swim, shake and tilt your head to remove water from the ears. If water remains, use a hair dryer on a low setting or antiseptic ear drops (or alcohol) to dry out the ears.

Tips and warnings

  • Swimming in nonchlorinated water increases the risk of swimmer's ear.
  • Never stick an object, including cotton swabs, into your ear canal.

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