How does the skeletal system respond to exercise?

Written by charlotte johnson
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Exercise helps to prevent and relieve arthritis in the skeletal system. Joints are the parts of the skeletal system in which bones meet one another. They are essential for movement. Arthritis can cause pain and inflammation in the joints, making movement painful and even impossible in severe cases. Exercise strengthens muscles and increases flexibility, which in turn takes excess pressure off of joints. A combination of low-impact aerobics, strength training and flexibility exercises can lessen pain and achieve a greater range of motion in individuals who have arthritis. Those who regularly exercise from an early age are less likely to develop arthritis.

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Prevention of Injury

Regular exercise improves the density and strength of bones. This helps to reduce the likelihood of fractures, especially as individuals age. Exercise also improve balance and muscle condition, which makes it less likely that a person will fall and suffer bone damage as a result of the fall. Exercise can improve posture, especially in those suffering from a form of arthritis known as osteoporosis. The types of exercises that are most effective at preventing injuries are weight-bearing exercises, including low-impact aerobics and weight training.

Back Pain

Individuals who spend the majority of their day sitting down are at a greater risk of experiencing back pain. People who exercise tend to be leaner than those who do not exercise. This is beneficial to the back because extra weight can stress the bones within the spine as well as the muscles surrounding those bones. Exercise that targets the back also can strengthen muscles surrounding the spine, which reduces the chance of vertebrae compression. Although exercise affects the skeletal system in many positive ways, always consult your physician before beginning an exercise program.

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