What is a gilt pig?

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What is a gilt pig?
There are a number of terms to describe pigs based on their age and stage of production. (Hausschweine image by Teamarbeit from Fotolia.com)

Pork is the most commonly consumed meat worldwide. As with other domesticated farm animals, there is a set of terms used to describe pigs to identify factors like gender, age and stage of production.

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Gilts

In the United States, a young female pig at least six months of age that has had no more than one litter of piglets is commonly known as a "gilt." In some regions of the world, the term describes those that have had no litters.

What is a gilt pig?
Young female pigs are known as gilts. (Hausschweine image by Teamarbeit from Fotolia.com)

Sows

Adult female pigs that have had two or more litters of piglets are known as "sows." When a pig gives birth, it is known as "farrowing." On average, sows are pregnant for 114 to 115 days.

What is a gilt pig?
Adult pigs that have had more than two litters are known as sows. (piglets and sow.pigs in farm image by L. Shat from Fotolia.com)

Male Pigs

Domesticated male pigs that are castrated are known as "barrows," while those that are not castrated are called "boars." Wild pigs of either gender are commonly referred to as boars or wild boars.

What is a gilt pig?
While only domesticated male pigs are known as boars, the terms is also used to describe any wild pig. (wild boar image by Budai Károly from Fotolia.com)

Young Pigs

Baby pigs still suckling milk are referred to as "piglets" or simply "pigs." Once weaned, they are known as "weaners" or "weanlings" until they reach a weight of 18.1kg.

What is a gilt pig?
Suckling pigs are known as piglets until they are weaned. (cute piggys. image by Catabu from Fotolia.com)

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