Diet for low white blood count

Written by rebecca turley
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Diet for low white blood count
(Wojciech Wolak/http://www.sxc.hu)

A low white blood cell count can lead to a weakened immune system and a variety of physical ailments. It is therefore important to understand the signs and symptoms of a low white blood count, and to learn about the foods that can help control the levels of white blood cells in the body.

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Causes of a Low White Blood Count

Although the reason for a low white blood count may not always be known, there are a number of underlying conditions that can produce a low white blood count, including: aplastic anaemia; cancer (as a result of chemotherapy drugs); autoimmune diseases, such as lupus and liver and spleen diseases; and leukaemia.

Signs and Symptoms of a Low White Blood Count

Many individuals with a low white blood count may experience a multitude of gastrointestinal, lung, throat and bladder infections. It is therefore common for individuals with a low blood count to experience a lack of energy, fever, sinus infections, headaches, lung infections, mouth sores, diarrhoea, stomach cramping and urination problems.

Treating a Low White Blood Count

Once your physician has ruled out an underlying cause of your low white blood count, he will likely encourage a diet rich in zinc and copper to help boost and control your white blood count levels. The doctor may also prescribe a white blood cell booster, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim.

Foods for Controlling Your Low White Blood Count

Some of the foods suggested for treating a low white blood count include oysters, dark meat, pumpkin seeds, shitake mushrooms, fish oil, spinach, carrots, melons and oranges.

Vitamins for a Low White Blood Count

Most physicians will recommend treating a low white blood count with a multivitamin with zinc.

Considerations

Continue to seek treatment with your physician following your low white blood count diagnosis so that he can continue to monitor your white blood levels to prevent illness.

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