Styles of Champagne Glasses

Written by alyson paige
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Styles of Champagne Glasses
Champagne glass styles vary according to function, but crystal is best. (two champagne glasses image by MAXFX from Fotolia.com)

The uninitiated might think of two types of champagne vessels: flutes and glasses. The range of styles of champagne glasses actually includes the coupe, the flute, the tulip and many subsections of types, such as la grande dame, the yellow label and the sommeliers champagne flute. Champagne-glass styles exist to better present the beauty of champagne and to highlight its sparkling taste. Crystal glasses are the most appropriate accompaniment.

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The Coupe

Some champagne-glass styles, such as the coupe -- meaning "glass" -- date back to the early 19th century. Most people recognise the coupe due to its short stem and wide saucer-shaped bowl. Not all cultures equally value the coupe, which was designed for its portability at banquets. According to Notcot, a design website, British and Russian champagne drinkers consider the coupe elegant and practical. The coupe does not present champagne's sparkle and bouquet.

Styles of Champagne Glasses
Champagne coupe glasses are the least desirable type for champagne aficionados. (verres de champagne image by iMAGINE from Fotolia.com)

Flutes

As the 19th century progressed, the flute, with its elongated bowl, came on the scene. Varieties of champagne flutes exist, including the trumpet, which has a wider mouth. Expert drinkers drink champagne from a flute because the bowl design preserves champagne's bouquet and sparkle. Hold a champagne flute by the stem to maintain the liquid's temperature. Champagne bubbles less in the flute and more in the drinker's mouth.

Styles of Champagne Glasses
Champagne flutes highlight champagne's bubble and bouquet. (flute de champagne image by razorconcept from Fotolia.com)

Tulip

The tulip-style champagne glass is a relative newcomer to the champagne sipper scene. Introduced in the 1930s, it has a long stem with which to hold the glass, helping to keep the champagne cold as you drink. A tulip's glass bowl is half egg-shaped at the bottom, long and curved in at the top, highlighting champagne's visual aesthetic and preserving its sparkle.

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