Methoxyisoflavone side effects

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Methoxyisoflavone side effects
Strength or resistance training typically means building muscle mass, which methoxyisoflavone is supposed to help. (haltérophilie image by Danielle Bonardelle from Fotolia.com)

Methoxyisoflavone is a flavonoid, typically taken as a dietary supplement and marketed to athletes interested in increasing strength and muscle mass, particularly during training, according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Experts at Health Library clarify that methoxyisoflavone is touted as a dietary supplement that works like an anabolic steroid but without the testosterone-like side effects. However, there are no studies to prove its efficacy or the absence of the indicated side effects.

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Steroid-like Side Effects

Users of methoxyisoflavone, a supplement that claims to provide hormone-like benefits similar to anabolic steroids without their testosterone- or oestrogen-like side effects, shouldn't experience an increase in acne, a decrease in good cholesterol levels (HDL), an enlarged prostate or male pattern baldness, according to eVitamins. However eVitamins cautions that no conclusive studies support the long-term absence of these side effects.

Methoxyisoflavone side effects
Male pattern baldness is a side effect of anabolic steroids that methoxyisoflavone manufacturers say users won't experience. (Bald man from backside image by TekinT from Fotolia.com)

Interactions

Possible interactions with drugs or dietary supplements that may occur with methoxyisoflavone are unknown, according to eVitamins. Health Library indicates that the limited studies published on the uses, effects and interactions of methoxyisolfavone have no reasonable credibility because they weren't published in peer-reviewed journals under strict regulations.

Methoxyisoflavone side effects
Possible interactions of methoxyisoflavone with other dietary supplements are unknown. (A stack of different coloorful tablets image by Marek Kosmal from Fotolia.com)

Defined

Although methoxyisoflavone is not found in substantial amounts in any one food, according to Health Library, it is an isoflavone found in soy products. The substance is considered an active part of soy products and contains oestrogen-like properties. The FDA allows foods containing soy products to be labelled as heart-healthy because of their cholesterol-lowering properties.

Methoxyisoflavone side effects
Soy products contain isoflavones such as methoxyisoflavones. (Soya beans on green leaf image by Monika 3 Steps Ahead from Fotolia.com)

Expert Insight

The National Center for Biotechnology Information reports that in a December 2003 published study on the effects of methoxyisoflavone, even the projected muscle-building effects of the supplement were not realised. The study concludes that the anabolic/catabolic hormone levels of the weightlifting athletes who used the supplement were unaffected. The only viable results reported are in the prevention of bone loss such as what occurs in osteoporosis and the reduction of bone resorption.

Methoxyisoflavone side effects
Methoxyisoflavone may show potential as a bone-loss treatment. (fighting bones image by chrisharvey from Fotolia.com)

Warning

Dietary supplements such as methoxyisoflavone are not as strictly monitored or regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as drugs and food products are. So there are no federal requirements stipulating that a dietary supplement must live up to its efficacy claims or be tested as safe. Safety and efficacy are the responsibility of the manufacturer, so consumers should consult their physicians or pharmacists before starting a new dietary supplement.

Methoxyisoflavone side effects
Methoxyisoflavone is a dietary supplement so the manufacturer is responsible for safety and efficacy testing before marketing. (hand s image by Andrey Kiselev from Fotolia.com)

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