What are the symptoms of stomach polyps?

Written by dana severson
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Stomach polyps form when the stomach lining becomes inflamed and forms small protrusions. These protrusions can eventually become ulcerous. Symptoms usually appear only when the polyps are large or great in number.

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Absence of Symptoms

According to the Mayo Clinic, stomach polyps won't cause any symptoms at all in most people. This is largely due to the size and severity of the polyps. When a polyp is small, which is the case for the majority of people, it won't cause a disruption within the functioning of the stomach or form into a lesion or sore.

Pain & Discomfort

When the stomach polyps grow larger or increase in number, the patient may begin to suffer from some pain or discomfort in the abdominal region. As the condition persists, the abdomen may become more tender than normal and develop a heightened sensitivity to touch.

Digestive Disturbance

For some people, polyps will cause nausea and intermittent episodes of vomiting. For others, stomach polyps will cause an increase in stomach gases, prompting an increase in both bloating and belching. Since the polyps are affecting the actual lining of the stomach, it is also possible for these protrusions to influence a person's appetite, making her experience the sensation of "fullness" sooner than normal.

Blood

If the polyps develop into lesions or sores, the individual can begin to notice the presence of blood in the stool or vomit. Depending on the severity of the lesions, a person's stool may become dark and tarry, which is an indication of internal bleeding from the ulcerated polyps in the stomach.

Fatigue

With some stomach polyps, a person can become increasingly fatigued. This would mostly happen if the condition spreads and polyps begin to develop further into the digestive tract.

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