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How to Get the Smell of Cigarettes Out of Your Nose

Updated March 21, 2017

Nothing is more annoying than having the smell of cigarettes stuck in your nose. This phenomenon is caused in part by the chemicals found in cigarette smoke being absorbed into your mucus or nasal passage. The chemicals tend to linger within your nasal cavity, causing you to continuously smell cigarettes. This can happen to smokers or second-hand smokers. Although there are plenty of home remedies to get the smell of smoke out of a home, it is sometimes hard to get the odour of cigarettes out of your nose.

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  1. Remove the physical smell of cigarette smoke from your environment. Although the aromas are stuck in your nose, it is best to remove smoke odours from your home or car.

  2. Spray odour-reducing sprays in your car and house. Throw out ashtrays or other storage units for your burnt cigarettes.

  3. Place air fresheners throughout your home and in your car.

  4. Wash out your mouth. Since the sense of smell and taste are connected, you might eliminate some lingering aromas by washing out your mouth. Use mouthwash to eliminate any odours stuck on your tongue, teeth, or gums. Then, consume a few mints to freshen up your mouth.

  5. Blow your nose a few times. If the cigarette smell is stuck within mucus, blowing your nose to remove the mucous accumulation in the front of your nose may help.

  6. Avoid smoking or being around smokers for awhile. Ending the accumulation of cigarette smells around you will help your nostrils clear up dead cells and mucus. Over time, this should minimise the stuck cigarette smell in your nose.

  7. Tip

    If the odour of cigarettes is still caught in your nose over a long period of time, such as a month, you may need to consult a doctor. A doctor will examine the inside of your nose to see if there are any abnormalities that could be trapping cigarette odours.

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Things You'll Need

  • Odour-reducing sprays
  • Air fresheners
  • Mints
  • Mouthwash
  • Tissues

About the Author

Mark Fitzpatrick began writing professionally in 2006. He has written in literary journals such as Read Herrings and provides written online guides for towns ranging from Seymour, Connecticut to Haines, Alaska. He earned a Bachelor of Arts in political science from the University of Massachusetts.

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