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How to Restore Brass Bathroom Taps

Brass bathroom taps and other types of fixtures add a touch of elegance to your bathroom. When the brass appears dark, dull and tarnished, however, the taps simply look old. Cleaning and restoring the brass taps make the fixtures look shiny and glossy, similar to how they looked when first installed. It's important to clean and restore the brass taps fairly often to remove the tarnish that builds up on the surface.

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  1. Pour a small amount of nail polish remover on a cotton ball and lightly rub it across the surface of the brass tap. Check the tap and see if the brass still looks shiny or has a slightly dull finish. If it looks dull, then you have a lacquer or protective coating. Rub the cotton ball all over the tap to remove this finish.

  2. Mix equal parts of distilled white vinegar, salt and flour in a small bowl. Apply the mixture to the brass taps and let it sit for at least two hours, until the paste fully dries on the taps. Wipe away the paste with distilled water applied to a soft cloth.

  3. Rub 0000 steel wool lightly across the surface of the brass taps. Add a small amount of vinegar to the taps, if you're worried about the steel wool scratching the brass. Dry the tap and brush away any loose debris with a soft cloth.

  4. Apply brass polish directly to the surface of the brass taps, adding a thin layer to all brass areas. The polish will give the brass a natural shine when applied properly.

  5. Wipe a soft cloth across the bathroom taps, rubbing lightly and using a small amount of pressure. Keep buffing the brass, using different areas of the cloth, until you remove all traces of the brass polish.

  6. Tip

    Olive oil is a natural alternative to brass polish. Use olive oil the same way you would a commercial or store-bought polish.

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Things You'll Need

  • Nail polish remover
  • Cotton balls
  • Distilled white vinegar
  • Salt
  • Flour
  • Small bowl
  • Distilled water
  • Soft cloth
  • 0000 steel wool
  • Brass polish

About the Author

Jennifer Eblin has been a full-time freelance writer since 2006. Her work has appeared on several websites, including Tool Box Tales and Zonder. Eblin received a master's degree in historic preservation from the Savannah College of Art and Design.

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