1989 25 HP Mariner Outboard Specifications

Written by bridgette ashmore
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1989 25 HP Mariner Outboard Specifications
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Mariner is a division of Mercury Marine that started offering outboard motors at a reduced cost in the United States in 1976. Mercury engines range from 2.5 horsepower to 350hp and include sterndrives, inboards, outboards and trolling motors. This variety is designed to meet a wide variety of needs.

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The 1989 Mariner outboard engine was a two-cylinder two-stroke engine that produced 25 horsepower. The gear ratio was 1.7 to 1. The minimum rpm was 4,000 and the maximum was 4,600. The gears had 10 splines, and the overall weight was 43.1kg. Three-blade props and manual starts were common on these engines. The top travel speed was 35mph.

Common Uses

The Mariner 25-hp motor was most commonly used on smaller boats, such as jon boats and runabouts, that ranged in size from 16 to 18 feet. It was certainly not limited to these vessels, though; many fishermen and water sport enthusiasts also employed this motor to propel them around their favourite lake. Its smaller size allowed for great versatility while providing enough power to manoeuvre a small vessel with ease.

Propeller Options

If you happen to acquire this older motor without a propeller, you will be pleased to know that the prop is one of the easiest parts to replace. You will need to purchase the hub assembly and three "D" blades. The cost of a complete prop was about £74 in December 2010. The size of the blades determines the top speed of your boat. The following sizes are compatible with the 1989 25-hp Mariner:

10 inches by 9 inches by 3 inches, which will yield 17 to 21mph;

10 inches by 10.5 inches by 3 inches, which will yield 19 to 24mph;

10 inches by 11 inches by 3 inches, which will yield 21 to 25mph;

10 inches by13 inches by 3 inches, which will yield 25 to 30mph;

10 inches by 15 inches by 3 inches, which will yield 28 to 35mph.

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