The plants & animals of the coastal plain

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The plants & animals of the coastal plain
The wild boar is one of many species of animals living in the Coastal Plains. (wild boar image by Budai Károly from Fotolia.com)

The Coastal Plains is an area in Georgia that consists of an upper and lower region. The environment of the Coastal Plains consists of low flattened areas, rolling hills and wet flat lands that have little drainage. The wildlife and plants living in the plains are as diverse as the area itself.

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Wild Boar

Although wild boar is not native to Northern America, the animal was introduced in the 1900s to allow for hunting of pigs for sport. These large animals can grow up to 5 foot long and often weigh around 136 Kilogram. Boar have tusks that measure 2 to 5 inches long and are used for foraging and defence. Boars prefer to live near a water source and can often be found near streams and lakes. The boar's eyesight is very poor, but they have sharp hearing.

Gray Fox

The grey fox is a small carnivore that lives around the Okefenokee swamp of the coastal plains. The grassy marshes and abundant swamps provide the perfect living environment. Unlike the red fox, the grey variety is much more aggressive and actually will actively drive red fox from their territories. The grey fox is small, weighing 3.63 to 4.99 Kilogram, and is up to 15 inches tall and up to 44 inches long.

Sweetshrub

The Sweetshrub is a flowering plant that forms in colonies from the mother plant. The shrubs grow up to 10 feet tall and can spread out 4 to six feet. The plants are found mostly in woodlands and along streams in Piedmont and mountainous regions. The shrubs are also used in landscaping to form borders and provide a pleasant fragrance.

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