A Father's Visitation Rights in the UK

Written by cesar castro
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For a father who wants to stay in close contact with his children after a separation, a simple method is to arrange an agreement between the father and the former wife, which can be official and legally binding by solicitors. If the father has parental responsibility, either by being married to the mother when the child was born, by being present when the birth was registered and being able to sign the birth certificate as the official father, or via a Parent Responsibility Agreement, the father has rights and responsibilities to see his children.

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Contact Orders

A court-issued order is sometimes unnecessary if the parents can come into some kind of visitation agreement or mediation. However, if a contact order is legally issued, the parents are often given the leeway to work out the details themselves. The court will take many parameters into consideration. This includes taking consideration of the child's needs and whether the father is able to meet and fulfil these needs. The court will cater to the child's welfare. The court and a Children and a Family Court advisory and support service officer will collaborate and come to a settlement that everyone can agree on.

Residence Order

A residence order will determine where the child will live from now on. If a residence order has not been issued, the child will stay with the mother. The father can apply for residence order to obtain full custody of the child, but these are granted only if there are dire reasons.

Sole Parental Responsibility

If you have sole parental responsibility, you are entitled to announce where the child and father can meet and set the frequency of these meetings. If the father has sole parental responsibility, he will be entitled to set times and frequency. The court will interfere if it sees that the child's interests and welfare are undermined.

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