Government grants for recovering addicts

Written by rod howell
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Government grants for recovering addicts
Broken homes, childhood abuse and peer pressure are several factors leading to substance abuse. (John Foxx/Stockbyte/Getty Images)

About 1.8 million adult substance abuse patients were in treatment facilities in 2008 according to a national survey. Government grants from federal agencies are available to help recovering addicts move on to lives of independence. Non-profit organisations as well as state and local government agencies are awarded grants to support housing assistance programs, vocational training, counselling services and treatment and rehabilitation programs. Construction and renovation projects of substance abuse and housing facilities are covered by grants as well.

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Shelter Plus Care

The Shelter Plus Care program is funded by the Department of Health and Human Services. Grants are awarded to state and local government agencies as well as public housing authorities to provide rental assistance and supportive services to homeless substance abusers and individuals with disabilities. These services are provided to their family members as well.

Community Entitlement Grants Program

The Community Entitlement Grants Program awards grants to urban areas to construct or rehabilitate drug prevention and treatment centres and other neighbourhood centres. Funded by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, grants are used to acquire real property, renovate and make improvements to streets and other public facilities. Job-creation activities benefiting businesses are supported by grant funds as well. Grant amounts are determined by several factors, including the areas' poverty levels, populations, housing numbers and population growth in comparison to other metro areas.

Community Facilities Grant Program

The U.S. Department of Agriculture sponsors the Community Facilities Grant Program. Grants finance the construction, renovation and expansion of facilities used to house, rehabilitate and treat individuals with substance abuse problems. Grants cover equipment purchases needed for facility operations as well. The program awards grants to towns, districts and counties with fewer than 20,000 residents. Priority funding is given to areas with the lowest population and income levels. Up to 75 per cent of the project costs are covered by these grants.

Block Grants for Prevention and Treatment of Substance Abuse

The Department of Health and Human Services also sponsors block grants for states to plan, develop and implement prevention, treatment and rehabilitation activities helping individuals recover from drug and alcohol abuse. States use grants to fulfil program requirements, such as allocating more than 80 per cent to education and counselling programs and developing community-based activities and strategies to help prevent substance abuse. More than 5 per cent of funds cover programs for pregnant women and women with dependent children. Grants also cover testing for HIV, tuberculosis and other diseases and counselling, treatment and early-intervention services for substance abusers at risk for these diseases.

Veterans Rehabilitation, Alcohol and Drug Dependence

The Department of Veteran Affairs sponsors a grant program aimed at helping veterans overcome their addictions. These grants support several services and programs administered in VA medical centres and clinics. Some of these services include detoxification, substance abuse, family, individual and group therapies, relapse prevention, psychiatric care and social services. Vocational rehabilitation services to assist veterans in getting jobs are also covered by grants.

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