My GE Profile Ice Maker Is Making a Popping Noise

Written by meredith jameson
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My GE Profile Ice Maker Is Making a Popping Noise
Some popping sounds are normal and are part of typical ice production. ( Images)

GE Profile refrigerators are Energy Star qualified and include a water-filtration system, an integrated shelf-support system, a water-filter indicator, current temperature display, fast cool settings, an LED dispenser light and anti-frost technology. The ice maker is linked to the water-filtration system and can produce a full bin of ice in approximately 24 hours. If the ice maker is making a popping sound, there are a few possible reasons why.

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Ice Bin

Some sounds are normal in accordance with the ice bin, including a popping or buzzing sound when the ice maker is being filled with water. This water is then frozen and converted into ice cubes. When ice drops into the bin, this may also make a popping sound.

Temperature Change

If the temperature control in the freezer is adjusted either to a warmer or colder setting, including when setting the temperature to a colder setting to produce ice, some popping sounds may occur as the temperature changes inside the compartment. These sounds are normal and will lessen or go away once the temperature is fixed. Keep the doors shut as much as possible for the best results.

Ice-Maker Power

If the ice-maker power switch is turned on but the water supply to the refrigerator and freezer is not, usually due to the fact that the refrigerator is newly installed, a buzzing sound may be heard. Turn the ice-maker power switch to "Off" until the water line is connected to the unit. Leaving it "On" will potentially damage the water valve.

Refrigerator Operation

There are some normal popping sounds that can be heard during normal refrigerator and freezer operation, including the opening and closing of the electronic dampers, compressor activation, and expansion and contraction of the cooling coils. These sounds are all normal and to be expected.

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