How to write an effective letter of request for additional resources

Written by frank luger Google
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How to write an effective letter of request for additional resources
Sign the letter to give it more authority. (Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images)

A letter of request for additional resources is a formal document. You are trying to convince purse holders to take action on your behalf. Your language should be persuasive, convincing and sincere. If you feel the need for additional resources strongly enough, you should have no trouble achieving the proper tone.

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State what you need

A vague plea for further resources will make your request too ambiguous. Follow the advice of professional writer and editor Stacey Heaps of software shop Write Express and be specific. State the things you need, preferably in a list so they stand out. Don’t ask for more than you need. Providing resources is a costly business, especially if your list is extensive. Be reasonable and ask only for what you know can be provided.

Justify the request

Explain why you need the additional resources. The reasons should, of course, be in line with the organisation’s goals. If you need the resources to achieve a part of the organisation’s programme, this is a valid request. Where your request for additional resources is in competition with other requests, try to point out why your request, above others, deserves to be met. Back up your request with supporting documentation.

Timing

If you know the organisation has no spare funds, nor any excess resources currently, it is pointless making a request for additional resources. Time your request to coincide with the release of funds or arrival of further resources. Unless the funds and additional resources are already earmarked for other ventures, your request for additional resources should at least be given serious consideration.

Other

Keep your letter short and to the point. Don’t be tempted to indulge in petty bickering by letter. Maintain a professional approach. If relevant, mention similar cases to yours where additional resources were granted. This could persuade the powers-that-be of the merits of your case. Imagine yourself being the person who receives the letter. Work out how you would react to it. Make changes accordingly to ensure your letter reads well.

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