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How to Make a Dream Catcher Out of Willow

Capture your nightmares in a handmade willow dream catcher. Willow is a flexible material that can be bent into a circular form. According to Native American legend, if you hang your dream catcher from a bedroom doorway or ceiling, it will snag all your bad dreams in its tangles. The dream catcher allows good dreams to pass through its weavings and slide down the feathers. A handmade willow dream catcher ensures sweet dreams will be had by all.

Twist the willow branch into a circle that has the diameter of a salad plate, weaving the ends of the branches around each other to secure.

Tie the yarn at one spot on the willow circle with a knot. String the yarn from the knot across the circle to the edge of the willow circle about 4-inches away from the starting knot. Wrap the yarn around the circle once or tie a knot to secure the yarn. String the yarn across the circle again to a spot about 4 inches away from the second knot and wrap or tie the string to secure. Repeat this process until you have achieved a web of yarn around the inside edge of the willow circle. You should have an open area in the centre in the yarn web.

String three pony beads on a 4-inch length of yarn and tie one end of the yarn to a feather and the other end to an edge of the willow circle. Repeat two more times.

Tie a 6-inch loop of yarn to the completed willow dream catcher to hang it from a nail in a doorway or ceiling.

Tip

Floral wire can be used to help secure the willow circle, if needed.

Things You'll Need

  • 36-inch-long willow branch with the diameter of a pencil
  • Skein of yarn
  • Scissors
  • Nine pony beads
  • Three feathers
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About the Author

Linda Shepard has been staff writer for "C & G Newspapers" for over 10 years, covering local government and crime and serving as the newspaper's food writer. She has written for "Michigan Meetings Magazine" and is also the owner of Spectacularstrolls.com, an online business of self-guided walking tours.